Category: Explaining dissociation and DID

DID or OSDD: Does it matter?

DID or OSDD: Does it matter?

OSDD is a strange-sounding diagnosis and seen by many as a ‘not yet’ or ‘not quite’ version of dissociative identity disorder. This article explores the differences between the two diagnoses and whether that difference matters or is arbitrary.

read more
Should I talk to parts?

Should I talk to parts?

Should we talk to parts? Or does that make things worse? When someone switches, is this attention-seeking behaviour? And is talking to a ‘part’ in some way dangerous—does it reinforce pathological behaviour? What should you do?

read more
Help, I’ve got DID! Now what …?

Help, I’ve got DID! Now what …?

It’s scary to think you’ve ‘gone mad’. It’s scary to think you have some serious, incurable ‘mental illness’. It’s scary to not understand what on earth is going on in your brain. And perhaps what’s even scarier is finding out that what is ‘wrong’ with you has a name: dissociative identity disorder.

read more
Feeling Unreal: depersonalisation / derealisation disorder

Feeling Unreal: depersonalisation / derealisation disorder

‘I don’t feel real. All the time—literally all the time—I feel like I’m living life from behind a glass screen, or that I’m watching life as it’s happening on TV but it’s not real. I’m always ten yards removed from it. I don’t cry. I don’t feel things. I feel like I’m in a dream. I feel like I’m going mad. Even now, talking to you, I’m not sure if this is really happening or not or if I’m just imagining it. The GP says I’m just depressed, but I’m not.’

read more
Living in a Glass Bubble

Living in a Glass Bubble

I was abused by my dad, and also my grandad. And in many ways, I want to just leave it there and not say any more, because every time I say it a huge cloud of fear comes up and a voice screams in my ear that none of it really happened.

It’s like, for a moment, my heart falls into my feet and I’m overcome by this terror that I really am just making it up, and that there’s something terribly wrong with me that I would do such a thing.

read more
Alters Assemble

Alters Assemble

How can we explain the experience of dissociation? Using an analogy from the superhero movie ‘Avengers Assemble’, one survivor explains what life is like for her to live with multiple parts of the personality.

read more
Developing compassion for parts

Developing compassion for parts

When we have dissociative identity disorder, the problem is not always simply that we have dissociated parts of the personality. The problem more often is in the hatred we can feel for these disavowed parts: ‘She is the hated child’. How do we heal the trauma of self-rejection and develop compassion for even the most traumatised and alienated parts of ourselves?

read more
Working with a dissociative disorder diagnosis

Working with a dissociative disorder diagnosis

Once we understand dissociation as a logical response to overwhelming trauma, it stops being so dramatic and different, and the person suffering dissociation stops being ‘complex’ and ‘bizarre’ too. There is nothing bizarre about dissociative disorders—what is bizarre is how some people can be so badly mistreated that they end up with a dissociative disorder.

read more
What is dissociation?

What is dissociation?

There are many ways to describe dissociation, and we look here at dissociation as it pertains to dissociative identity disorder and trauma.

read more
How is dissociative identity disorder diagnosed?

How is dissociative identity disorder diagnosed?

Diagnosis of dissociative disorders is by no means straightforward, mainly due to a lack of training and knowledge. The main diagnostic criteria can be found in the DSM-5 and this article explains how diagnosis is made.

read more
What is Dissociative Disorder Not Otherwise Specified (DDNOS)?

What is Dissociative Disorder Not Otherwise Specified (DDNOS)?

DDNOS is seen by many people as a ‘not yet’ or ‘a not quite’ version of dissociative identity disorder and although it is supposed to be a ‘residual category’ and only given to a few people, in fact the vast majority of people diagnosed with a dissociative disorder fall into this category.

read more
Parts are only part of the problem

Parts are only part of the problem

I have dissociative identity disorder. I have many separate, distinct and unique ‘parts’ of my personality. My ‘parts’ or ‘alters’ collectively add up to the total person that is me. I am the sum of all my parts. They are each a letter, and I am a sentence.

read more
Who am I? – Questions of identity in dissociative identity disorder

Who am I? – Questions of identity in dissociative identity disorder

I look up and I am in my therapist’s room. I look up and I am in the cafe area of the shopping mall. I look up and I am in bed in the dark. I look up and I don’t know if I am I. There is no thread of continuity between these places, these experiences. Who am I now, writing this, re-reading this, re-writing this?

read more
What is it like to be me? – I am DID

What is it like to be me? – I am DID

What is it like to be me? What is it like to be the me that is me-not-you, different, alone, DID?

You – in my minds you are you-not-us, but who am I to you? Can you know me?

read more

Free Trauma Survivors' Resource Guide for New Subscribers

Join our mailing list and receive a FREE PDF version of our newly updated, 100-page 'Trauma Survivors' Resource Guide'!

Thank you for joining us! Your Trauma Survivors' Resource Guide is on its way to your inbox now.