Category: Impact of trauma on the body

Meeting pain with pain

Meeting pain with pain

When we’ve suffered abuse in childhood, we often experienced pain. And that pain was reflected back in the eyes of our abusers as pleasure. We then take that template and expectation into our adult relationships, expecting only to be able to get close to people or be approved of by them if we’re in pain. This is the topic of Carolyn’s blog post in which she draws on her own experiences in one particular therapy session.

read more
Making the most of your GP Appointment

Making the most of your GP Appointment

‘I’m not seeing a doctor!’ I insisted with a look on my face that was intended to end the debate once and for all. As far as I was concerned, it was simple: I wasn’t going to the hospital, walk-in centre or GP surgery, because I couldn’t go. I couldn’t cope with going. Such was my abject terror that, unless it was a matter of life or death, I avoided all things medical.
The problem? This was rapidly becoming a matter of life and death.

read more
Managing Medical Procedures

Managing Medical Procedures

It might have been ‘just a routine blood test’ but that didn’t stop me passing out. Again.

From a teenager through into adulthood, even the word ‘medical’ could render me light-headed. I couldn’t bear the sight of blood, I couldn’t even hear descriptions of blood; hospitals and doctors and dentists and needles were meticulously avoided. Someone once described to me an accident they’d had involving a mangled leg, and within 5 seconds I was starting to feel faint. Within ten I was sweating and shaking. Within fifteen I was unconscious in a heap on the floor.

For a long time I didn’t understand why I was such a ‘wuss’, as I saw it.

read more
The Trauma Traffic Light

The Trauma Traffic Light

The ‘trauma traffic light’ represents three physiological states that the body can shift gear between, depending on levels of threat or security in the world: the green zone, the amber zone or the red zone. Carolyn Spring explains this concept she developed based on Stephen Porges’ polyvagal therory.

read more
It’s a pain: the physical impact of trauma

It’s a pain: the physical impact of trauma

Physical symptoms are a big part of life for me with DID. Yes, I have ‘multiple personalities’, the “two or more distinct identities that recurrently take control of the body” and I’m not for one moment denying the significance of that or the impact it has on my day-to-day life. But I would say that physical symptoms such as chronic, unexplained pain, headaches and nausea have been and still remain far more distressing and life-impacting for me than the presence of parts.

read more
The body remembers

The body remembers

I hate my body. It was there, always there, during the abuse.

My mind went away but my body could not. My mind could forget.

read more

Free Emotional Resource Guide for New Subscribers

Join our mailing list and receive a FREE PDF version of our 80-page ‘Emotional Resource Guide’ which has helped countless trauma survivors and those who support them.

Thank you for joining us! Your Emotional Resource Guide is on its way to your inbox now.