PODCAST: #1 – SUICIDE

 
 
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Carolyn Spring talks about suicide … her own experience of numerous suicide attempts, the hopelessness and sense of trappedness, and how she has recovered.

For more information about Carolyn’s course, go to: www.carolynspring.com/suicide

12 Comments

  1. Lynne
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    Such an informative podcast & to hear such an insightful personal experience from Carolyn was invaluable .

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  2. Chris
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    It’s always odd to look back at that point, a moment where you just can’t do it anymore. That’s when you realise you have been fighting for years, you have been falling and getting back up over and over again, with no end in sight, it’s the breaking point that puts you on the edge and in that moment you are at so much risk, because your so tired and you just want it to stop. I sat on the bed with a belt in my hand and was lucky enough to choose to take another breath, then another, then allow a thought that says ‘is there another way, can you fight on’ and then walk back from the edge.

    Listening to this is odd, much of CS’s writing and teaching is, there are so many points of connection it almost feels she must have been there when you were processing the abuse, I often feel ‘how can she know’ but then I realised that the human mind must have a common set of tools for reacting to abuse, maybe we are all more alike than we know.

    Thank you for the recording. 🙂

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  3. louise
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    Thankyou Carolyn, so inspirational, your work changes lives

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  4. Louisa Jones
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    You get straight to the heart of the matter with clarity compassion and joy.

    YES to moving from -10 to +10, the degree to which one’s life force had been suppressed is, perhaps, commensurate with where it wants to bounce forward to, equal and opposite reaction!
    Thankyou for spreading this clarity and understanding.

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  5. Debs
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    Thank you Carolyn for talking so frankly about a subject that’s rarely spoken about by some who is open in their own experiences of being suicidal.

    The authenticity and truth in your words is compelling. As a long term, frequent suicidal thinker, hearing your thoughts on what suicide is and does is so much more real than words of someone simply trying to manage statistics, without the tormenting experience of suicide ruling everything.

    I am not DID though have plenty of dissociation in my life. I’ve followed and related to your blogs, article and your book for sometime now. Thank you so much and I look forward to your next podcast.

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  6. Tracy / Front Row
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    What I learnt very quickly and initially through my own fear and huge sense of responsibility for my client’s safety and hopeful happiness for her, was to talk. Talk, talk, explore and talk some more about any thoughts, feelings, ideas, fantasies or plans she may of had of suicide, just as I would with any other part of the client’s world. Through this exploration and safe platform to freely go there, she was able to say and hear out loud for the first time what she was actually thinking and feeling.
    Bringing it into the room gave her a voice, one that was heard and also one that she too was able to hear for herself. This voice, her voice, was empowering and choice, hope and life became another option.
    (My first experience of supporting a young suicidal client).
    Thank you Carolyn, your recovery is a gift you continue to give to others.

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  7. Liz SakerSmith
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    It’s so refreshing to hear the discussion on a subject that people in general do not want to engage in unless they have had personal experience themselves. As a society we do need to talk more and be more educated. Should it be included as a Life Skill at secondary school level? Hats off to you and the work you are continuing to do, from a fellow survivor of abuse. I was also on the brink of suicide but did find the strength within to live. Your book has given hope to me and many others.

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  8. Harriet
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    Amazing insight into pain and suffering. Hopefully this will help many people. Suicidal people are often swept under the carpet!

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  9. melissa
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    by surviving and sharing how to, you really are helping others re-write their scripts too. Thank you Carolyn. The course was so beneficial for my training as a counsellor and has already proved a positive resource for my clients. And the course was so positive, not as heavy as I anticipated.

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  10. bil mulberry
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    Thank you for recording this podcast. Very helpful. I am already booked on to your course for March. Looking forward to it. Thank you for sharing your story and information.

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  11. Jo
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    Carolyn you are truly inspiring. Listening to you today really touched me and triggered memories of my very dark, sad & isolated days and how your tender approach would have helped. Compassion has indeed been a massive part of moving forward in my life. I’m still striving to find that happy place but can appreciate the connection I get from life when it happens.

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  12. Michelle
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    Hi Carolyn,
    Thanks for putting this together. A lot of it resonates with my own experience, particularly the similarity with feeling suicidal and dissociation. I feel like I’m disappearing into my eyes.
    There is, however, a point of difference that I think is important. You speak about the persona of the victim and suicidal ideation coming from a place of feeling that life is not fair. For me it is the opposite; I’m fully aware that suffering is part of the human experience and many people have been subjected to horrors beyond my imagination. But, whilst they can cope, I feel that I can’t. I feel that I have failed at being human, that I am not resilient enough and therefore I want to die.
    What keeps me alive is the acute knowledge of the hurt I would inflict to others should I take my own life. It is a double-bind, as I am forced to live with this intense pain for the sake of sparing those around me. That is what seems to be unfair, not that I have been subject to abuse in the first instance.
    I point this out because I suspect mine is not a unique experience and you may like to consider this difference for your training.

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